How to Get Cans in the Fridge Faster

How to Get Cans in the Fridge Faster

The Guinness World Record for “fastest time to put 24 cans in a fridge” is 5.78 seconds.[1] X Research source We believe that it’s possible to beat this time—especially considering the recent developments in the world of high-speed grocery unpacking. The process is simple and efficient, and it’s one of the those rare life hacks that actually works. If you want to speed up the unpacking process after you get home from the grocery store, read on to see learn more about this elegant technique.

Method 1 of 2:
Preparing the Fridge and Package

1
Clear out a space in your fridge for your cans. With a little bit of prep work, you’re going to push the cans directly out of the cardboard case and on to a shelf in your fridge. For this to work, you need the empty shelf space, though. Clear out the area where you want to place your cans and make sure that there’s a little extra room, just in case. This will work with cases of glass bottles as well, although there is an added possibility that a bottle will break if you accidentally tip one of the bottles over. It can certainly be done—just be careful. This will work with 6, 12, 24, and 32 packs of cans. If you’ve got one of those 24 or 32 packs with two rows of cans stacked on top of one another, you just need to work a little slower to keep the columns intact.
2
Open one end of the case by hand. Set your case on top of the counter and turn it so that either end of the case is facing you. Peel open the case by breaking the glued flaps with your fingers. It doesn’t matter which end of the case you open first. They’re functionally identical. Some fridge-packing purists believe that this process is easier if you rip the flaps off of this end. Feel free to tear the flaps off if you’d like. It’ll probably help with the bigger cases that have multiple rows, but it shouldn’t make a huge difference.[2] X Research source
3
Transfer your case to the fridge with the closed end facing out. Lift the case of cans up at a slight angle so that the open end is pointing up (or just put your hand over the end to keep the cans in). Set the case down on the shelf that you cleared out with the closed end facing you. [3] X Research source Just to clarify, the open end should now be closest to the back of your fridge.
4
Open the closed end of the case. Pry the flaps open by hand the same way you did before. Check the label on your cans before proceeding to make sure they’re facing the right direction. If they aren’t, carefully flip the case over on the shelf so that the labels are facing the right direction. [4] X Research source You can actually do this in another order if you prefer by opening both ends of the case on the counter and then just setting it inside of the fridge. When carrying it this way, you have to block both ends with your hands so that the cans don’t slide out.[5] X Research source
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Method 2 of 2:
Pushing the Cans

1
Hold the case in place with your nondominant hand. Line the case up so that the longest side runs parallel to the sides of your fridge. Then, pinch or grip any open edge of the cardboard case with your nondominant hand. [6] X Research source Once you get good at this, you should be able to perform this part in a few seconds.
2
Push the cans through the case while pulling the cardboard out. Place your dominant palm against the cans in the case. Slowly push the cans out towards the back of the fridge. At the same time, pull the cardboard case towards you. The cans will start sliding out, right-side up, onto the shelf in your fridge. [7] X Research source If you’ve got a larger case with two rows of cans stacked on top of each other, push gently on the bottom row and just go a little slower. You should be able to keep the cans stacked atop one another.
3
Pull the cardboard case out and line your cans up as desired. Continue pushing the cans out while pulling the cardboard towards you. Slide the case out of the fridge and discard it. Adjust the cans on the shelf to put them into neat little rows, or leave them where they’re at and call it a day. For a little dramatic flair, feel free to keep your dominant arm in place and then slide the cardboard case up to your bicep. Then, do a nice little flex and bend the cardboard case to show onlookers that your fridge-packing skills are not to be messed with.[8] X Research source
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Method 1 of 2:
Preparing the Fridge and Package

1
Clear out a space in your fridge for your cans. With a little bit of prep work, you’re going to push the cans directly out of the cardboard case and on to a shelf in your fridge. For this to work, you need the empty shelf space, though. Clear out the area where you want to place your cans and make sure that there’s a little extra room, just in case. This will work with cases of glass bottles as well, although there is an added possibility that a bottle will break if you accidentally tip one of the bottles over. It can certainly be done—just be careful. This will work with 6, 12, 24, and 32 packs of cans. If you’ve got one of those 24 or 32 packs with two rows of cans stacked on top of one another, you just need to work a little slower to keep the columns intact.
2
Open one end of the case by hand. Set your case on top of the counter and turn it so that either end of the case is facing you. Peel open the case by breaking the glued flaps with your fingers. It doesn’t matter which end of the case you open first. They’re functionally identical. Some fridge-packing purists believe that this process is easier if you rip the flaps off of this end. Feel free to tear the flaps off if you’d like. It’ll probably help with the bigger cases that have multiple rows, but it shouldn’t make a huge difference.[2] X Research source
3
Transfer your case to the fridge with the closed end facing out. Lift the case of cans up at a slight angle so that the open end is pointing up (or just put your hand over the end to keep the cans in). Set the case down on the shelf that you cleared out with the closed end facing you. [3] X Research source Just to clarify, the open end should now be closest to the back of your fridge.
4
Open the closed end of the case. Pry the flaps open by hand the same way you did before. Check the label on your cans before proceeding to make sure they’re facing the right direction. If they aren’t, carefully flip the case over on the shelf so that the labels are facing the right direction. [4] X Research source You can actually do this in another order if you prefer by opening both ends of the case on the counter and then just setting it inside of the fridge. When carrying it this way, you have to block both ends with your hands so that the cans don’t slide out.[5] X Research source
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Method 2 of 2:
Pushing the Cans

1
Hold the case in place with your nondominant hand. Line the case up so that the longest side runs parallel to the sides of your fridge. Then, pinch or grip any open edge of the cardboard case with your nondominant hand. [6] X Research source Once you get good at this, you should be able to perform this part in a few seconds.
2
Push the cans through the case while pulling the cardboard out. Place your dominant palm against the cans in the case. Slowly push the cans out towards the back of the fridge. At the same time, pull the cardboard case towards you. The cans will start sliding out, right-side up, onto the shelf in your fridge. [7] X Research source If you’ve got a larger case with two rows of cans stacked on top of each other, push gently on the bottom row and just go a little slower. You should be able to keep the cans stacked atop one another.
3
Pull the cardboard case out and line your cans up as desired. Continue pushing the cans out while pulling the cardboard towards you. Slide the case out of the fridge and discard it. Adjust the cans on the shelf to put them into neat little rows, or leave them where they’re at and call it a day. For a little dramatic flair, feel free to keep your dominant arm in place and then slide the cardboard case up to your bicep. Then, do a nice little flex and bend the cardboard case to show onlookers that your fridge-packing skills are not to be messed with.[8] X Research source
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