How to Tie Springs in a Chair

How to Tie Springs in a Chair

Springs are the forgotten heroes of our favorite armchairs that help make our seats comfortable. In order to function properly, these springs needed to be tied securely to the chair so they don’t shift out of their proper positions.[1] X Research source Whether you’re crafting a new chair or repairing an old one, tying your springs is an important step to keep your seat sturdy and comfortable. If you don’t have a lot of experience with this process, there’s no need to worry—this guide will help answer some of your most frequently asked questions.

Question 1 of 5:
What supplies do you need?

Image titled Load a Staple Gun Step 1
1
You need twine and a staple gun. You'll stretch the twine from end-to-end on your chair’s frame, tying it to each spring to hold them in place. Then, you'll use a staple gun to secure the twine to both sides of the chair frame. [2] X Research source Professional upholsterers use an air-powered staple gun for this, along with 1⁄2 in (1.3 cm) staples.
2
Use a section of string that’s 150% longer than the length or width of your chair. As you tie the string into knots, the string becomes shorter and shorter as it stretches across your seat. The string needs to be nice and long, so you don’t run out of slack halfway through the tying process. [3] X Research source
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Question 2 of 5:
How many strings do you need?

1
Get 2 strings for each coiled spring. Chair strings are tied in a square, grid-like fashion. Each coiled spring has 1 section of string going through it vertically and horizontally, which ensures that it’ll stay taut and snug. [4] X Research source
2
Use 1 string for every 4 zig-zag springs. Zig-zag springs aren’t quite as high-maintenance as coils. Instead of creating a grid, you just need a few sections of string stretched horizontally across. [5] X Research source
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Question 3 of 5:
How do you tie coiled springs?

1
Knot and staple the string to the frame. Take the end of your string and tie 2 knots along the end. Place this knotted section along the chair frame and staple it into place, so your string stays taut. To create the grid shape over strings, staple the string in place on all 4 sides of your chair frame. [6] X Research source
2
Tie the string directly to the spring. Loop the string over and under the edge of the first spring. Then, bring the string back over the edge and pull it forward. Repeat this process on the bottom and top edge of every spring. [7] X Research source You aren’t actually knotting the string—this way, if you make a mistake, you can easily unravel and re-tie the string to the spring.
3
Loop together any intersecting strings. Pull the second string over the taut length of twine that’s already stretched over the coil. Loop the new string over and under this twine, and continue pulling it forward. [8] X Research source This creates a really taut, secure grid of string in the chair.
4
Staple the string along the other side of the frame. Tie the twine around the last coil and pull the rest of the slack forward. Finish things off with your staple gun to hold this section of string in place. [9] X Research source
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Question 4 of 5:
How do you tie zig-zag springs?

Image titled Tie a Constrictor Knot Step 11
1
Knot and staple the string to the end of the chair or sofa frame. Tie the twine into a knot, and secure it into place with a staple gun. This helps keep the string tight and secure as you tie the springs. [10] X Research source These strings will be perpendicular to the zig-zag coils. You’ll be stapling the twine to the frames that are parallel to your zig-zag coils.
2
Tie the string horizontally across the zig-zags. Pull the stapled string forward toward the first zig-zag coil. Loop the string over and under the bottom curve of the spring; then, pull the extra slack over the taut string and back under the same spring. Pull the excess string forward, repeating this looping process on all the other vertical springs installed along your seat. [11] X Research source
3
Staple the leftover twine in an “N” shape on the other end of the frame. Secure 1 cm (0.39 in) of the string in place with a staple, then bend the rest of the string tail into a zig-zag shape. Staple the twine in this “N” shape for extra security. [12] X Research source
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Question 5 of 5:
How do you fix weak springs in a couch?

Image titled Hang Wreaths Step 8
1
Secure zig-zag springs with twine. Reset any loose springs back into their proper clips. Then, knot a short length of twine toward the end of the spring and staple it to the nearest furniture frame. [13] X Research source
2
Add a new layer of webbing to chairs with coiled springs. Pick up a roll of chair webbing online or from a specialty shop. Stretch 3 strips of webbing vertically across the chair and staple them into place. Then, stretch and staple 3 more strips of webbing that go horizontally across the chair. Weave the horizontal strips over and under the vertical strips, like you’re making a basket. Staple the second set of strips into place to finish installing the webbing. [14] X Research source For reference, a basic upright chair uses about 6 pieces of overlapping webbing. This new webbing will go over a layer of older webbing.
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Question 1 of 5:
What supplies do you need?

Image titled Load a Staple Gun Step 1
1
You need twine and a staple gun. You'll stretch the twine from end-to-end on your chair’s frame, tying it to each spring to hold them in place. Then, you'll use a staple gun to secure the twine to both sides of the chair frame. [2] X Research source Professional upholsterers use an air-powered staple gun for this, along with 1⁄2 in (1.3 cm) staples.
2
Use a section of string that’s 150% longer than the length or width of your chair. As you tie the string into knots, the string becomes shorter and shorter as it stretches across your seat. The string needs to be nice and long, so you don’t run out of slack halfway through the tying process. [3] X Research source
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Question 2 of 5:
How many strings do you need?

1
Get 2 strings for each coiled spring. Chair strings are tied in a square, grid-like fashion. Each coiled spring has 1 section of string going through it vertically and horizontally, which ensures that it’ll stay taut and snug. [4] X Research source
2
Use 1 string for every 4 zig-zag springs. Zig-zag springs aren’t quite as high-maintenance as coils. Instead of creating a grid, you just need a few sections of string stretched horizontally across. [5] X Research source
Advertisement

Question 3 of 5:
How do you tie coiled springs?

1
Knot and staple the string to the frame. Take the end of your string and tie 2 knots along the end. Place this knotted section along the chair frame and staple it into place, so your string stays taut. To create the grid shape over strings, staple the string in place on all 4 sides of your chair frame. [6] X Research source
2
Tie the string directly to the spring. Loop the string over and under the edge of the first spring. Then, bring the string back over the edge and pull it forward. Repeat this process on the bottom and top edge of every spring. [7] X Research source You aren’t actually knotting the string—this way, if you make a mistake, you can easily unravel and re-tie the string to the spring.
3
Loop together any intersecting strings. Pull the second string over the taut length of twine that’s already stretched over the coil. Loop the new string over and under this twine, and continue pulling it forward. [8] X Research source This creates a really taut, secure grid of string in the chair.
4
Staple the string along the other side of the frame. Tie the twine around the last coil and pull the rest of the slack forward. Finish things off with your staple gun to hold this section of string in place. [9] X Research source
Advertisement

Question 4 of 5:
How do you tie zig-zag springs?

Image titled Tie a Constrictor Knot Step 11
1
Knot and staple the string to the end of the chair or sofa frame. Tie the twine into a knot, and secure it into place with a staple gun. This helps keep the string tight and secure as you tie the springs. [10] X Research source These strings will be perpendicular to the zig-zag coils. You’ll be stapling the twine to the frames that are parallel to your zig-zag coils.
2
Tie the string horizontally across the zig-zags. Pull the stapled string forward toward the first zig-zag coil. Loop the string over and under the bottom curve of the spring; then, pull the extra slack over the taut string and back under the same spring. Pull the excess string forward, repeating this looping process on all the other vertical springs installed along your seat. [11] X Research source
3
Staple the leftover twine in an “N” shape on the other end of the frame. Secure 1 cm (0.39 in) of the string in place with a staple, then bend the rest of the string tail into a zig-zag shape. Staple the twine in this “N” shape for extra security. [12] X Research source
Advertisement

Question 5 of 5:
How do you fix weak springs in a couch?

Image titled Hang Wreaths Step 8
1
Secure zig-zag springs with twine. Reset any loose springs back into their proper clips. Then, knot a short length of twine toward the end of the spring and staple it to the nearest furniture frame. [13] X Research source
2
Add a new layer of webbing to chairs with coiled springs. Pick up a roll of chair webbing online or from a specialty shop. Stretch 3 strips of webbing vertically across the chair and staple them into place. Then, stretch and staple 3 more strips of webbing that go horizontally across the chair. Weave the horizontal strips over and under the vertical strips, like you’re making a basket. Staple the second set of strips into place to finish installing the webbing. [14] X Research source For reference, a basic upright chair uses about 6 pieces of overlapping webbing. This new webbing will go over a layer of older webbing.
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