How to Improve Your Frontal Lobe Function

How to Improve Your Frontal Lobe Function

Your frontal lobe is always hard at work, even if you don’t realize it. Whether you’re going for a walk, hanging out with friends, or counting change at the store, your frontal lobe is working hard to get it all done.[1] X Research source Additionally, your prefrontal cortex, or the very front of your frontal lobe, plays a big role in this critical-thinking and decision-making.[2] X Research source While there’s no machine or pill that will instantly give this part of your brain a boost, there are plenty of ways to improve your brain functioning overall.

Method 1 of 11:
Memorize silly sentences and acronyms.

1
Word play forces your prefrontal cortex to tap into your memory. Give yourself an extra challenge by reading through some brain-twisting riddles, or by committing special jokes, puns, and acronyms to memory. Creating different word associations forces your brain to think a bit more flexibly as it juggles different word associations. [3] X Research source You can find a lot of clever riddles, jokes, and mnemonic devices online.
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Method 2 of 11:
Play a game of Name, Place, Animal, Things with some friends.

1
Name, Place, Animal, Things is a great boost for your prefrontal cortex. [4] X Research source In this game, draw out a diagram with 4 columns, with each column representing a “name,” “place,” “animal,” and “thing.” Pick a letter of the alphabet for the round, and set a timer for 60 seconds. During this time, write down as many words in each category as you can, making sure each word starts with the chosen alphabet letter. When time is up, give yourself 10 points for each original answer, and 5 points for any answers you share with another player. [5] X Research source This game is a great way to boost your memory.[6] X Research source Sudoku, Scrabble, and Minesweeper are other engaging games that offer great challenges for your prefrontal cortex.
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Method 3 of 11:
Complete a jigsaw puzzle.

1
Jigsaw puzzles demand a lot of hand-eye coordination. This falls under the frontal lobe’s domain! Get the gears in your brain turning with a complicated jigsaw puzzle, which forces both your hands and your mind to team up for a greater goal. [7] X Research source You solve online jigsaw puzzles here: https://www.jigsawplanet.com.
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Method 4 of 11:
Solve some math problems.

1
Basic math offers a stimulating challenge for your prefrontal cortex. Download some math worksheets online—these don’t have to be super complicated. Simply filling out counting tables can be a great boost for your prefrontal cortex. [8] X Research source Check out these online math problems: https://pbskids.org/games/math.
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Method 5 of 11:
Cook a new recipe.

1
Cooking is an excellent way to exercise your prefrontal cortex. Unlike other activities, cooking involves using all 5 senses. Search online for easy recipes you can try, before working your way up to something more challenging. [9] X Research source
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Method 6 of 11:
Exercise frequently.

1
Exercise gives your memory a boost. Studies show that people who exercise regularly have more volume in their prefrontal cortex, as well as other parts of the brain. Consistently exercising for just 6 months can give your prefrontal cortex a boost. To really improve your memory, try to exercise for at least 120 minutes each week. [10] X Trustworthy Source Harvard Medical School Harvard Medical School's Educational Site for the Public Go to source This exercise doesn’t have to be super intense—just taking regular, brisk walks can help boost your memory.
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Method 7 of 11:
Meditate regularly.

1
Meditation increases the gray matter in your prefrontal cortex. You don’t have to make a big lifestyle change—studies show that 8 weeks of basic meditation can improve your brain. [11] X Research source To help you get started, listen to guided meditations, which walk you through the process. [12] X Research source Guided meditations come in all sizes! You might sit and listen to a 15-minute meditation, or try a 4-minute one instead.
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Method 8 of 11:
Maintain a consistent sleep schedule.

1
Wake up and go to bed at a consistent time each night. Studies show that your memory actually improves after getting some rest. Think of your brain like an email inbox—when you sleep, your brain has more time to organize the “emails” that flooded the inbox throughout the day. [13] X Trustworthy Source PLOS ONE Online peer-reviewed, open access scientific research journal Go to source
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Method 9 of 11:
Eat beets.

1
Beet roots have a lot of nitrates, which turn into nitrites after you eat them. Nitrites help widen your blood vessels, and help more blood flow into your frontal lobe area. [14] X Research source Spinach, fennel, radishes, and other leafy vegetables are also high in nitrates. [15] X Trustworthy Source PubMed Central Journal archive from the U.S. National Institutes of Health Go to source
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Method 10 of 11:
Volunteer in your community.

1
Studies show that volunteering gives your brain function a boost. If you have some extra free time, look for some volunteering opportunities, like a soup kitchen or litter clean-up. You’ll be improving your local community, as well as your own brain! [16] X Research source
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Method 11 of 11:
Embrace curiosity and new questions.

1
Try not to process new thoughts and experiences automatically. Instead, ask plenty of questions and challenge your usual ways of thinking—this type of mindset really engages your frontal lobe. [17] X Research source If you spot a beautiful sunset, you might research why the sky is so colorful instead of simply admiring the view.
Advertisement

Method 1 of 11:
Memorize silly sentences and acronyms.

1
Word play forces your prefrontal cortex to tap into your memory. Give yourself an extra challenge by reading through some brain-twisting riddles, or by committing special jokes, puns, and acronyms to memory. Creating different word associations forces your brain to think a bit more flexibly as it juggles different word associations. [3] X Research source You can find a lot of clever riddles, jokes, and mnemonic devices online.
Advertisement

Method 2 of 11:
Play a game of Name, Place, Animal, Things with some friends.

1
Name, Place, Animal, Things is a great boost for your prefrontal cortex. [4] X Research source In this game, draw out a diagram with 4 columns, with each column representing a “name,” “place,” “animal,” and “thing.” Pick a letter of the alphabet for the round, and set a timer for 60 seconds. During this time, write down as many words in each category as you can, making sure each word starts with the chosen alphabet letter. When time is up, give yourself 10 points for each original answer, and 5 points for any answers you share with another player. [5] X Research source This game is a great way to boost your memory.[6] X Research source Sudoku, Scrabble, and Minesweeper are other engaging games that offer great challenges for your prefrontal cortex.
Advertisement

Method 3 of 11:
Complete a jigsaw puzzle.

1
Jigsaw puzzles demand a lot of hand-eye coordination. This falls under the frontal lobe’s domain! Get the gears in your brain turning with a complicated jigsaw puzzle, which forces both your hands and your mind to team up for a greater goal. [7] X Research source You solve online jigsaw puzzles here: https://www.jigsawplanet.com.
Advertisement

Method 4 of 11:
Solve some math problems.

1
Basic math offers a stimulating challenge for your prefrontal cortex. Download some math worksheets online—these don’t have to be super complicated. Simply filling out counting tables can be a great boost for your prefrontal cortex. [8] X Research source Check out these online math problems: https://pbskids.org/games/math.
Advertisement

Method 5 of 11:
Cook a new recipe.

1
Cooking is an excellent way to exercise your prefrontal cortex. Unlike other activities, cooking involves using all 5 senses. Search online for easy recipes you can try, before working your way up to something more challenging. [9] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 6 of 11:
Exercise frequently.

1
Exercise gives your memory a boost. Studies show that people who exercise regularly have more volume in their prefrontal cortex, as well as other parts of the brain. Consistently exercising for just 6 months can give your prefrontal cortex a boost. To really improve your memory, try to exercise for at least 120 minutes each week. [10] X Trustworthy Source Harvard Medical School Harvard Medical School's Educational Site for the Public Go to source This exercise doesn’t have to be super intense—just taking regular, brisk walks can help boost your memory.
Advertisement

Method 7 of 11:
Meditate regularly.

1
Meditation increases the gray matter in your prefrontal cortex. You don’t have to make a big lifestyle change—studies show that 8 weeks of basic meditation can improve your brain. [11] X Research source To help you get started, listen to guided meditations, which walk you through the process. [12] X Research source Guided meditations come in all sizes! You might sit and listen to a 15-minute meditation, or try a 4-minute one instead.
Advertisement

Method 8 of 11:
Maintain a consistent sleep schedule.

1
Wake up and go to bed at a consistent time each night. Studies show that your memory actually improves after getting some rest. Think of your brain like an email inbox—when you sleep, your brain has more time to organize the “emails” that flooded the inbox throughout the day. [13] X Trustworthy Source PLOS ONE Online peer-reviewed, open access scientific research journal Go to source
Advertisement

Method 9 of 11:
Eat beets.

1
Beet roots have a lot of nitrates, which turn into nitrites after you eat them. Nitrites help widen your blood vessels, and help more blood flow into your frontal lobe area. [14] X Research source Spinach, fennel, radishes, and other leafy vegetables are also high in nitrates. [15] X Trustworthy Source PubMed Central Journal archive from the U.S. National Institutes of Health Go to source
Advertisement

Method 10 of 11:
Volunteer in your community.

1
Studies show that volunteering gives your brain function a boost. If you have some extra free time, look for some volunteering opportunities, like a soup kitchen or litter clean-up. You’ll be improving your local community, as well as your own brain! [16] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 11 of 11:
Embrace curiosity and new questions.

1
Try not to process new thoughts and experiences automatically. Instead, ask plenty of questions and challenge your usual ways of thinking—this type of mindset really engages your frontal lobe. [17] X Research source If you spot a beautiful sunset, you might research why the sky is so colorful instead of simply admiring the view.
Advertisement