How to Reduce Foamy Urine

How to Reduce Foamy Urine

It’s totally normal to have bubbles or some foam every now and then when you pee. But if you keep having white foam that sticks to the toilet bowl, you should see a doctor to make sure your kidneys are okay.

Method 1 of 6:
Background

1
Normal urine should be clear with a yellowish hue. The color can range from pale yellow to deep amber, depending on how diluted or concentrated the urine is. Some medications can change the color of your urine as a side effect. But, in general, healthy urine shouldn’t have any blood or foam in it. [1] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
2
It’s normal to pass foamy urine every now and then. The speed of urination and other factors such as chemicals or minerals in the water can cause bubbles or even some foam to form in the toilet. That’s fine. As long as it only happens occasionally and isn’t a regular thing. [2] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
3
Persistent foamy urine is a sign of protein in your urine. Your kidneys filter protein in your blood, but if they’re functioning normally, the protein stays in your body. So if you have a problem with your kidneys, protein can be released, which can cause foamy urine whenever you go to the restroom. [3] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 2 of 6:
Causes

1
Foamy urine could be a sign of mild dehydration. The more dehydrated you are, the more concentrated your urine will be. That can result in foamy urine because you’re passing more waste in less liquid. [4] X Research source
2
Kidney problems can also cause foamy urine. When you have protein in your urine, it’s called proteinuria. Proteinuria can be an early sign of kidney disease or of a condition that’s impacting the way your kidneys function. [5] X Research source There are a number of diseases and conditions that can affect your kidneys, such as lupus, diabetes, or high blood pressure. [6] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 3 of 6:
Symptoms

1
You can have white foam that stays on the toilet after flushing. It’s normal to have some bubbles in the toilet whenever you urinate. But the bubbles should be big, clear, and disappear whenever you flush. If you have thick, white foam that stays in the toilet bowl even after you flush, that’s foamy urine. [7] X Research source
2
You may also have swelling in your hands, feet, abdomen, or face. If you have kidney damage, it can cause other problems and symptoms. If you have swelling in other areas of your body in addition to foamy urine, it could be a sign of severe kidney damage. Talk to your doctor immediately about the problem. [8] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 4 of 6:
Diagnosis

1
Your doctor may recommend a urine test to check your protein levels. A urine test will tell them if you have elevated protein levels and how high they are. That can give your doctor a clue of what’s causing your foamy urine, and how severe the problem is. [9] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
2
If you don’t have diabetes or HPB, kidney disease could be the cause. Your doctor will work to rule out potential causes of your foamy urine. If you have high blood pressure (HBP) or diabetes, they may want to try to better manage those conditions to see if that clears up your foamy urine and reduces your protein levels. If you don’t have any other conditions that could be causing your foamy urine, you may be in the early stages of kidney disease. [10] X Trustworthy Source Cleveland Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
Advertisement

Method 5 of 6:
Treatment

1
Try drinking more clear fluids if the issue is dehydration. If you spot foamy urine in the toilet, a good first step is to drink a big glass of water. That may clear up the problem on the spot if you’re experiencing a mild case of dehydration. [11] X Research source The US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recommends that men should drink about 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of fluids and women should aim for about 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) of fluids a day. [12] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
2
You may need medication as well as dietary and lifestyle changes. If your foamy urine is caused by kidney disease, you’ll need to work with your doctor to come up with an effective treatment plan. That can include medications to help treat your kidney disease. You may also need to lose some weight through a healthy diet and exercise to help improve your kidney health. But it’s important that you follow your doctor’s recommendations so you can be sure they’re safe and effective for you. [13] X Trustworthy Source Cleveland Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
3
An ACE inhibitor or an ARB may help protect your kidneys. Both ACE inhibitors and ARBs are medications that relax your blood vessels and allow blood to flow more easily through your body. They’re commonly prescribed for folks who have high blood pressure. Your doctor may also prescribe them to make it easier for blood to flow through your kidneys, lightening their workload and protecting them from further damage. [14] X Research source
4
Managing your diabetes or high blood pressure is critical. If you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or another condition that’s impacting the health of your kidneys, it’s crucial that you stay on top of it. Kidney damage can be permanent and potentially lead to other serious health problems. Try your best to control any conditions that could be straining your kidneys. [15] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 6 of 6:
Prognosis

1
The prognosis depends on the cause of your foamy urine. Some people with mild or temporary proteinuria may not need any treatment at all. [16] X Trustworthy Source Cleveland Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source For other folks who may have an underlying disease such as diabetes or HBP, if you can manage your condition, your kidneys may not release protein that can cause foamy urine and it’ll stop. If you have kidney disease, it’s important that you stick to the treatment plan you and your doctor come up with: take any medications they prescribe and make any dietary and lifestyle changes they recommend. [17] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 1 of 6:
Background

1
Normal urine should be clear with a yellowish hue. The color can range from pale yellow to deep amber, depending on how diluted or concentrated the urine is. Some medications can change the color of your urine as a side effect. But, in general, healthy urine shouldn’t have any blood or foam in it. [1] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
2
It’s normal to pass foamy urine every now and then. The speed of urination and other factors such as chemicals or minerals in the water can cause bubbles or even some foam to form in the toilet. That’s fine. As long as it only happens occasionally and isn’t a regular thing. [2] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
3
Persistent foamy urine is a sign of protein in your urine. Your kidneys filter protein in your blood, but if they’re functioning normally, the protein stays in your body. So if you have a problem with your kidneys, protein can be released, which can cause foamy urine whenever you go to the restroom. [3] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 2 of 6:
Causes

1
Foamy urine could be a sign of mild dehydration. The more dehydrated you are, the more concentrated your urine will be. That can result in foamy urine because you’re passing more waste in less liquid. [4] X Research source
2
Kidney problems can also cause foamy urine. When you have protein in your urine, it’s called proteinuria. Proteinuria can be an early sign of kidney disease or of a condition that’s impacting the way your kidneys function. [5] X Research source There are a number of diseases and conditions that can affect your kidneys, such as lupus, diabetes, or high blood pressure. [6] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 3 of 6:
Symptoms

1
You can have white foam that stays on the toilet after flushing. It’s normal to have some bubbles in the toilet whenever you urinate. But the bubbles should be big, clear, and disappear whenever you flush. If you have thick, white foam that stays in the toilet bowl even after you flush, that’s foamy urine. [7] X Research source
2
You may also have swelling in your hands, feet, abdomen, or face. If you have kidney damage, it can cause other problems and symptoms. If you have swelling in other areas of your body in addition to foamy urine, it could be a sign of severe kidney damage. Talk to your doctor immediately about the problem. [8] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 4 of 6:
Diagnosis

1
Your doctor may recommend a urine test to check your protein levels. A urine test will tell them if you have elevated protein levels and how high they are. That can give your doctor a clue of what’s causing your foamy urine, and how severe the problem is. [9] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
2
If you don’t have diabetes or HPB, kidney disease could be the cause. Your doctor will work to rule out potential causes of your foamy urine. If you have high blood pressure (HBP) or diabetes, they may want to try to better manage those conditions to see if that clears up your foamy urine and reduces your protein levels. If you don’t have any other conditions that could be causing your foamy urine, you may be in the early stages of kidney disease. [10] X Trustworthy Source Cleveland Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
Advertisement

Method 5 of 6:
Treatment

1
Try drinking more clear fluids if the issue is dehydration. If you spot foamy urine in the toilet, a good first step is to drink a big glass of water. That may clear up the problem on the spot if you’re experiencing a mild case of dehydration. [11] X Research source The US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recommends that men should drink about 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of fluids and women should aim for about 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) of fluids a day. [12] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
2
You may need medication as well as dietary and lifestyle changes. If your foamy urine is caused by kidney disease, you’ll need to work with your doctor to come up with an effective treatment plan. That can include medications to help treat your kidney disease. You may also need to lose some weight through a healthy diet and exercise to help improve your kidney health. But it’s important that you follow your doctor’s recommendations so you can be sure they’re safe and effective for you. [13] X Trustworthy Source Cleveland Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source
3
An ACE inhibitor or an ARB may help protect your kidneys. Both ACE inhibitors and ARBs are medications that relax your blood vessels and allow blood to flow more easily through your body. They’re commonly prescribed for folks who have high blood pressure. Your doctor may also prescribe them to make it easier for blood to flow through your kidneys, lightening their workload and protecting them from further damage. [14] X Research source
4
Managing your diabetes or high blood pressure is critical. If you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or another condition that’s impacting the health of your kidneys, it’s crucial that you stay on top of it. Kidney damage can be permanent and potentially lead to other serious health problems. Try your best to control any conditions that could be straining your kidneys. [15] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 6 of 6:
Prognosis

1
The prognosis depends on the cause of your foamy urine. Some people with mild or temporary proteinuria may not need any treatment at all. [16] X Trustworthy Source Cleveland Clinic Educational website from one of the world's leading hospitals Go to source For other folks who may have an underlying disease such as diabetes or HBP, if you can manage your condition, your kidneys may not release protein that can cause foamy urine and it’ll stop. If you have kidney disease, it’s important that you stick to the treatment plan you and your doctor come up with: take any medications they prescribe and make any dietary and lifestyle changes they recommend. [17] X Research source
Advertisement