How to Find a LGBTQIA Friendly Therapist

How to Find a LGBTQIA Friendly Therapist

Finding a therapist you can trust can be difficult, especially for queer folks. How can you feel comfortable discussing your personal life with someone if you aren’t sure that know how to work with LGBTQIA people? Fortunately, you can find LGBTQIA-friendly therapists who actually specialize in counseling queer people. But you may not know where to begin, so we’ve compiled a list of a few common questions to help you find the perfect therapist for you.

Method 1 of 6:
How do I find a queer therapist?

1
Look for one through an online directory of therapists. Probably the easiest and most effective way to find a therapist that specializes in working with LGBTQIA folks is to look for one online. Use an online directory of therapists and adjust the filter for therapists who work with queer or LGBTQIA people. Look for a therapist that fits the bill near you and contact them to set up an appointment. [1] X Research source You can find the HealthPro directory at https://www.helppro.com/. PsychologyToday also has a database at https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapists.
2
Reach out to a local LGBTQIA mental health group if you have one. If you have a local LGBTQIA center or organization, try contacting them about licensed therapists they recommend. They may also have therapists on staff who are trained to work with the LGBTQIA community. If they do, you can make an appointment to see one of them at the facility. [2] X Research source
3
Check out a therapist’s website to see if they’re LGBTQIA friendly. If you want to find out whether or not a therapist you’re considering is trained or specializes in working with the LGBTQIA community, visit their website. Look for information that specifically refers to queer or LGBTQIA therapy. Use their website to get a sense of who they are and help you decide whether or not you want to work with them. [3] X Research source
4
You could also use e-counseling if there isn’t a therapist near you. If there isn’t a LGBTQIA-friendly therapist in your area, or you don’t have access to a therapist, an e-counseling platform like BetterHelp or Talkspace could be a great option for you. They have a ton of counselors who specialize in LGBTQIA issues that you can choose from. Once you’ve made an appointment, you can use your phone or computer to talk to your therapist from home. [4] X Research source
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Method 2 of 6:
What is queer therapy?

1
It’s an approach that embraces a positive view of LGBTQIA people. LGBTQIA affirmative therapy, also known as queer therapy or LGBT affirmative therapy, is a view that aims to create a more inclusive practice for queer folks. It doesn’t condemn or attempt to convert queer people. Affirmative therapy also addresses the negative influences that homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism have on the lives of LGBTQIA people. [5] X Research source
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Method 3 of 6:
How do I know if a therapist is LGBTQIA friendly?

1
You can ask them questions about their training and experience. If you aren’t sure if your therapist is queer-friendly, ask them if they have any training, knowledge, or experience in working with LGBTQIA folks. You can also ask them what their sexual orientation and gender identity is. You may also want to ask them about their thoughts on conversion therapy or therapies that aim to convert LGBTQIA people into heterosexual people. If they support those types of therapies, they may not be queer-friendly. [6] X Research source
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Method 4 of 6:
Why should I see a LGBTQIA-friendly therapist?

1
It can reduce the fear and anxiety of going to therapy. Finding a therapist you share common ground with can help you feel more confident about seeking therapy. You also may not have to spend as much time discussing your sexual identity if your therapist specializes in working with queer folks. If you’re queer and you’re struggling with mental health issues, try looking for an LGBTQIA-affirming therapist you can talk to. [7] X Research source
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Method 5 of 6:
How do you become a LGBTQIA therapist?

1
Earn a degree in counseling and specialize in LGBTQIA counseling. So you want to work with queer folks as a therapist or counselor—that’s so great! The first step is to earn a bachelor’s degree in counseling, where you’ll learn the ins and outs of being a therapist. From there, you can earn a master’s degree in LGBTQIA counseling, where you’ll specialize in working with queer folks. Once you have your degrees, you can become a licensed LGBTQIA therapist! [8] X Research source
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Method 6 of 6:
How do I find a therapist of color?

1
You can use an online directory to find one. Use an online database to search for therapists near you and filter the results for multicultural therapists. You can also use an online directory that only contains therapists who are people of color as well. Once you find one in your area, contact them to make an appointment. You can use the PsychologyToday multicultural therapist search tool at https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapists/multicultural. The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network maintains a database you can use to search for a queer therapist or a therapist of color at https://www.nqttcn.com/directory.
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Method 1 of 6:
How do I find a queer therapist?

1
Look for one through an online directory of therapists. Probably the easiest and most effective way to find a therapist that specializes in working with LGBTQIA folks is to look for one online. Use an online directory of therapists and adjust the filter for therapists who work with queer or LGBTQIA people. Look for a therapist that fits the bill near you and contact them to set up an appointment. [1] X Research source You can find the HealthPro directory at https://www.helppro.com/. PsychologyToday also has a database at https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapists.
2
Reach out to a local LGBTQIA mental health group if you have one. If you have a local LGBTQIA center or organization, try contacting them about licensed therapists they recommend. They may also have therapists on staff who are trained to work with the LGBTQIA community. If they do, you can make an appointment to see one of them at the facility. [2] X Research source
3
Check out a therapist’s website to see if they’re LGBTQIA friendly. If you want to find out whether or not a therapist you’re considering is trained or specializes in working with the LGBTQIA community, visit their website. Look for information that specifically refers to queer or LGBTQIA therapy. Use their website to get a sense of who they are and help you decide whether or not you want to work with them. [3] X Research source
4
You could also use e-counseling if there isn’t a therapist near you. If there isn’t a LGBTQIA-friendly therapist in your area, or you don’t have access to a therapist, an e-counseling platform like BetterHelp or Talkspace could be a great option for you. They have a ton of counselors who specialize in LGBTQIA issues that you can choose from. Once you’ve made an appointment, you can use your phone or computer to talk to your therapist from home. [4] X Research source
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Method 2 of 6:
What is queer therapy?

1
It’s an approach that embraces a positive view of LGBTQIA people. LGBTQIA affirmative therapy, also known as queer therapy or LGBT affirmative therapy, is a view that aims to create a more inclusive practice for queer folks. It doesn’t condemn or attempt to convert queer people. Affirmative therapy also addresses the negative influences that homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism have on the lives of LGBTQIA people. [5] X Research source
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Method 3 of 6:
How do I know if a therapist is LGBTQIA friendly?

1
You can ask them questions about their training and experience. If you aren’t sure if your therapist is queer-friendly, ask them if they have any training, knowledge, or experience in working with LGBTQIA folks. You can also ask them what their sexual orientation and gender identity is. You may also want to ask them about their thoughts on conversion therapy or therapies that aim to convert LGBTQIA people into heterosexual people. If they support those types of therapies, they may not be queer-friendly. [6] X Research source
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Method 4 of 6:
Why should I see a LGBTQIA-friendly therapist?

1
It can reduce the fear and anxiety of going to therapy. Finding a therapist you share common ground with can help you feel more confident about seeking therapy. You also may not have to spend as much time discussing your sexual identity if your therapist specializes in working with queer folks. If you’re queer and you’re struggling with mental health issues, try looking for an LGBTQIA-affirming therapist you can talk to. [7] X Research source
Advertisement

Method 5 of 6:
How do you become a LGBTQIA therapist?

1
Earn a degree in counseling and specialize in LGBTQIA counseling. So you want to work with queer folks as a therapist or counselor—that’s so great! The first step is to earn a bachelor’s degree in counseling, where you’ll learn the ins and outs of being a therapist. From there, you can earn a master’s degree in LGBTQIA counseling, where you’ll specialize in working with queer folks. Once you have your degrees, you can become a licensed LGBTQIA therapist! [8] X Research source
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Method 6 of 6:
How do I find a therapist of color?

1
You can use an online directory to find one. Use an online database to search for therapists near you and filter the results for multicultural therapists. You can also use an online directory that only contains therapists who are people of color as well. Once you find one in your area, contact them to make an appointment. You can use the PsychologyToday multicultural therapist search tool at https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapists/multicultural. The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network maintains a database you can use to search for a queer therapist or a therapist of color at https://www.nqttcn.com/directory.
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