How to Do a Santa Voice

How to Do a Santa Voice

When you picture Santa Claus, you almost certainly imagine him having a deep, booming, jovial voice that’s punctuated with a trademark “ho, ho, ho!” There are ways you can try to mimic the Santa voice you’ve heard on TV, but being a convincing Santa is at least as much about the attitude you bring to your voice. Focus on sounding, appearing, and acting kind, approachable, merry, and wise—and practice your belly laugh while you’re at it!

Method 1 of 3:
Santa-fying Your Voice

1
Sound joyful instead of trying to copy a specific voice. If you get too caught up trying to sound like a specific Santa, like one from a movie, TV show, or department store, your voice will end up sounding really fake. Instead, focus more on giving your own voice a joyful attitude! The kids and adults you meet will remember your attitude way more than the specifics of your voice. [1] X Research source Who says Santa can’t sound just like you? If you leave everyone smiling and full of holiday spirit, you’ll know you’ve done your job! Listen to other Santa voices not so much to copy their sound, but to get inspired by their joviality.
2
Deepen your voice a little without going overboard. If you want to do a “classic Santa” that doesn’t sound exactly like you, aim to make your normal voice just sound a little deeper. Practice putting your hand on your belly and exhaling from your diaphragm while you speak. Don’t go so deep that you can’t speak with a smile, though! [2] X Research source When you deepen your voice, there can be a fine line between sounding like “jovial Santa” versus “grumpy Santa” or even “creepy Santa.” Always remember that the attitude you present with your voice is what counts!
3
Do practice conversations in the mirror using your Santa voice. Practicing beforehand gives you the chance to fine-tune any tweaks you’re making to your normal voice. Using a mirror lets you see whether or not you make a “happy face” while doing your version of Santa’s voice. If you can’t look jolly while speaking as Saint Nick, make adjustments until you can. [3] X Research source This may seem less important if you’re just planning on calling someone as Santa. In reality, though, genuinely smiling and being happy while you talk makes your voice sound more joyful, even if the other person can’t see you! Practice saying things you’re likely to say as Santa, such as “What would you like for Christmas, Jane?” or “Yes, Rudolph has been a very good reindeer this year!”
4
Use a “Santa voice” app to leave someone a message from Kris Kringle. If you’re looking to make a call or leave a message as Santa and just aren’t satisfied with your own Santa voice, there are apps that can help. Search your preferred app store for “Santa voice” and check out your options. While some apps have another person read your chosen message in a Santa voice, others let you modulate the sound of your own recorded voice to make it more Santa-like. This is a good option if you want Santa to call your kids, but are worried they’ll recognize your slightly “Santa-fied” voice. You can tinker with the app until the voice sounds practically nothing like yours. Make sure you choose a legitimate app that has the seal of approval from your app store and lots of good user reviews.
Advertisement

Method 2 of 3:
Mastering a Santa Laugh

1
Laugh out your “ho, ho, ho” instead of speaking it. “Ho, ho, ho” isn’t supposed to be Santa’s catchphrase—it’s supposed to be the closest approximation of what his laugh sounds like! So, don’t practice saying the phrase in a jovial way. Instead, practice shaping your laugh so it makes this classic sound. [4] X Research source It may help to listen to yourself laugh naturally. Consider recording yourself watching one of your favorite funny videos, shows, or movies. Work on how to combine your natural laugh with the “ho, ho, ho” sound.
2
Place your hand on your belly to focus on your diaphragm. While “ho, ho, ho” is indeed a laugh, doing a simple singing exercise can help you bring your version of Santa’s iconic chuckle to the surface. Stand with your hand placed right over your belly button and your fingers spread out. Pay attention to what you feel once you start practicing your Santa sounds. [5] X Research source Don’t push in forcefully. Apply mild to moderate pressure instead.
3
Feel your belly draw in each time you make a “ho” sound. When it’s time to practice making your Santa laugh, feel it coming from deep inside your belly. Make your “ho, ho, ho” with a forceful puff of air from your diaphragm. Your belly should pull in, not push out, with each “ho” sound you make. [6] X Research source Using your diaphragm creates a deeper, richer sound. They call it a “belly laugh” for a reason!
4
Practice your facial expressions and body language in the mirror. Don’t strain so hard to laugh from deep in your belly that your Santa smile turns into a grimace. Dial back on the forcefulness of your belly laugh, if necessary, so that you can maintain a jolly expression. Your body should also stay relaxed—and if your belly jiggles a bit, all the better! [7] X Research source Pay attention to your eyes while you do your Santa laugh, especially if you’ll be wearing a puffy white Santa beard. The beard will conceal much of your face, so it’s up to your eyes to cue in the crowd that you’re jolly and joyful.
Advertisement

Method 3 of 3:
Speaking as Santa

1
Remind yourself that Santa is always caring, loving, and jovial. You simply can’t do a good Santa voice if you don’t have the right attitude! If you’re bored, disinterested, distracted, frustrated, or upset, those feelings will always shine through. In this case, it’s probably best to hand over the beard and red suit to someone who is feeling the joy of the season. [8] X Research source Being Santa is a big deal! People look to Saint Nick as a beacon of joy and caring. If you need it, give yourself a little holiday boost before transforming into Santa. Think back to some of the most joyous holiday experiences of your childhood.
2
Ask easy questions to put nervous kids at ease. You can’t predict how kids will respond to Santa. When a child is apprehensive, dial back on the boisterousness of your joy, but maintain a happy and caring attitude. Try asking a few simple questions to get the child talking. For example: [9] X Research source “What kind of treats do you think I should give my reindeer this year?” “Do you think it’s snowing back home at the North Pole?” “Have you been working on your Christmas list?” “What is your favorite holiday song?”
3
Practice answering silly and difficult questions appropriately. While some kids clam up around Santa, others are full of questions. They might ask you how you get all around the world in one night, how you fit all the presents in your sleigh, or even if you’re the “real” Santa Claus! Come up with consistent answers beforehand that fit your Santa persona—you might focus on your “Santa magic,” for instance, or how the Earth’s rotation gives you extra night-time to work with. [10] X Research source Kids may also ask difficult or uncomfortable questions. They may ask why you didn’t bring them the toy they really wanted last year, or even if you can bring back a loved one who passed away during the year. In these cases, you may want to work on tactful ways to let them know that Santa’s magic does have its limits.
4
Skip the “Bad Santa” routine unless you’re sure it suits your audience. If you’re playing Santa at an adults-only party, it might be okay to act a bit flirtatious or tell some off-color jokes. But make sure you read the room! Lots of adults like to get the loving, kindly, jolly Santa experience instead of some naughty version. [11] X Research source Of course you should stick to your jolly Santa persona around younger kids, but also do your best to stay in character around older kids as well. It’s best not to assume that they all no longer believe in Santa!
Advertisement

Tips

Submit a Tip
All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published
Submit
Thanks for submitting a tip for review!

Method 1 of 3:
Santa-fying Your Voice

1
Sound joyful instead of trying to copy a specific voice. If you get too caught up trying to sound like a specific Santa, like one from a movie, TV show, or department store, your voice will end up sounding really fake. Instead, focus more on giving your own voice a joyful attitude! The kids and adults you meet will remember your attitude way more than the specifics of your voice. [1] X Research source Who says Santa can’t sound just like you? If you leave everyone smiling and full of holiday spirit, you’ll know you’ve done your job! Listen to other Santa voices not so much to copy their sound, but to get inspired by their joviality.
2
Deepen your voice a little without going overboard. If you want to do a “classic Santa” that doesn’t sound exactly like you, aim to make your normal voice just sound a little deeper. Practice putting your hand on your belly and exhaling from your diaphragm while you speak. Don’t go so deep that you can’t speak with a smile, though! [2] X Research source When you deepen your voice, there can be a fine line between sounding like “jovial Santa” versus “grumpy Santa” or even “creepy Santa.” Always remember that the attitude you present with your voice is what counts!
3
Do practice conversations in the mirror using your Santa voice. Practicing beforehand gives you the chance to fine-tune any tweaks you’re making to your normal voice. Using a mirror lets you see whether or not you make a “happy face” while doing your version of Santa’s voice. If you can’t look jolly while speaking as Saint Nick, make adjustments until you can. [3] X Research source This may seem less important if you’re just planning on calling someone as Santa. In reality, though, genuinely smiling and being happy while you talk makes your voice sound more joyful, even if the other person can’t see you! Practice saying things you’re likely to say as Santa, such as “What would you like for Christmas, Jane?” or “Yes, Rudolph has been a very good reindeer this year!”
4
Use a “Santa voice” app to leave someone a message from Kris Kringle. If you’re looking to make a call or leave a message as Santa and just aren’t satisfied with your own Santa voice, there are apps that can help. Search your preferred app store for “Santa voice” and check out your options. While some apps have another person read your chosen message in a Santa voice, others let you modulate the sound of your own recorded voice to make it more Santa-like. This is a good option if you want Santa to call your kids, but are worried they’ll recognize your slightly “Santa-fied” voice. You can tinker with the app until the voice sounds practically nothing like yours. Make sure you choose a legitimate app that has the seal of approval from your app store and lots of good user reviews.
Advertisement

Method 2 of 3:
Mastering a Santa Laugh

1
Laugh out your “ho, ho, ho” instead of speaking it. “Ho, ho, ho” isn’t supposed to be Santa’s catchphrase—it’s supposed to be the closest approximation of what his laugh sounds like! So, don’t practice saying the phrase in a jovial way. Instead, practice shaping your laugh so it makes this classic sound. [4] X Research source It may help to listen to yourself laugh naturally. Consider recording yourself watching one of your favorite funny videos, shows, or movies. Work on how to combine your natural laugh with the “ho, ho, ho” sound.
2
Place your hand on your belly to focus on your diaphragm. While “ho, ho, ho” is indeed a laugh, doing a simple singing exercise can help you bring your version of Santa’s iconic chuckle to the surface. Stand with your hand placed right over your belly button and your fingers spread out. Pay attention to what you feel once you start practicing your Santa sounds. [5] X Research source Don’t push in forcefully. Apply mild to moderate pressure instead.
3
Feel your belly draw in each time you make a “ho” sound. When it’s time to practice making your Santa laugh, feel it coming from deep inside your belly. Make your “ho, ho, ho” with a forceful puff of air from your diaphragm. Your belly should pull in, not push out, with each “ho” sound you make. [6] X Research source Using your diaphragm creates a deeper, richer sound. They call it a “belly laugh” for a reason!
4
Practice your facial expressions and body language in the mirror. Don’t strain so hard to laugh from deep in your belly that your Santa smile turns into a grimace. Dial back on the forcefulness of your belly laugh, if necessary, so that you can maintain a jolly expression. Your body should also stay relaxed—and if your belly jiggles a bit, all the better! [7] X Research source Pay attention to your eyes while you do your Santa laugh, especially if you’ll be wearing a puffy white Santa beard. The beard will conceal much of your face, so it’s up to your eyes to cue in the crowd that you’re jolly and joyful.
Advertisement

Method 3 of 3:
Speaking as Santa

1
Remind yourself that Santa is always caring, loving, and jovial. You simply can’t do a good Santa voice if you don’t have the right attitude! If you’re bored, disinterested, distracted, frustrated, or upset, those feelings will always shine through. In this case, it’s probably best to hand over the beard and red suit to someone who is feeling the joy of the season. [8] X Research source Being Santa is a big deal! People look to Saint Nick as a beacon of joy and caring. If you need it, give yourself a little holiday boost before transforming into Santa. Think back to some of the most joyous holiday experiences of your childhood.
2
Ask easy questions to put nervous kids at ease. You can’t predict how kids will respond to Santa. When a child is apprehensive, dial back on the boisterousness of your joy, but maintain a happy and caring attitude. Try asking a few simple questions to get the child talking. For example: [9] X Research source “What kind of treats do you think I should give my reindeer this year?” “Do you think it’s snowing back home at the North Pole?” “Have you been working on your Christmas list?” “What is your favorite holiday song?”
3
Practice answering silly and difficult questions appropriately. While some kids clam up around Santa, others are full of questions. They might ask you how you get all around the world in one night, how you fit all the presents in your sleigh, or even if you’re the “real” Santa Claus! Come up with consistent answers beforehand that fit your Santa persona—you might focus on your “Santa magic,” for instance, or how the Earth’s rotation gives you extra night-time to work with. [10] X Research source Kids may also ask difficult or uncomfortable questions. They may ask why you didn’t bring them the toy they really wanted last year, or even if you can bring back a loved one who passed away during the year. In these cases, you may want to work on tactful ways to let them know that Santa’s magic does have its limits.
4
Skip the “Bad Santa” routine unless you’re sure it suits your audience. If you’re playing Santa at an adults-only party, it might be okay to act a bit flirtatious or tell some off-color jokes. But make sure you read the room! Lots of adults like to get the loving, kindly, jolly Santa experience instead of some naughty version. [11] X Research source Of course you should stick to your jolly Santa persona around younger kids, but also do your best to stay in character around older kids as well. It’s best not to assume that they all no longer believe in Santa!
Advertisement