How to Practice Elimination Communication

How to Practice Elimination Communication

Could you possibly imagine raising a child without disposable diapers? That's exactly what Elimination Communication is all about. While still common practice in the developing world, those in the west are starting to re-acquaint themselves with a lost art, in which all of babies' movements are done with the help of a potty or toilet. It's an activity that requires lots of time and devotion from both parents, which strengthens parental bonds to infants, saves lots of money, cuts back on waste, and makes potty training a breeze.

Steps

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1
Decide whether you can manage it. If you're unable to supervise your baby all through the day then you'll probably be unable to do it full time. At night the best option would be to use washable diapers (if you're aiming for the most environmental practice) rather than trying to wake baby and disrupting your own sleeping hours.
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2
Get the necessary gear to get started. You'll still need some diapers so buy up a set with multiple sizes. Most important is the potty, though this doesn't have to be the sort that toddlers use, it is an ideal option later (when babies can support themselves freely). One of the most well-known symbols of elimination communication is the "top hat" potty. This is a good for when your outside or it's cold because you can slip a soft pad on to keep them warm.
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3
Focus on your Babies' Body Language. Work out how long after being fed that they need to "go". This can be every 15 minutes to an hour (the time gap with grow wider with age). A baby knows when it has a full bladder just like we do, but is unable to control it at that stage. They will wriggle with discomfort when they need a pee or poop, just as anyone else would.
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4
When they're ready, gently hold them over the potty or toilet. if you're only using a "Top Hat" they can probably be just put on, but will still need to be held at the waist or underarms so they don't fall off. Even when your baby can sit up without assistance (usually after 6 months old but not always), they'll still need constant supervision. Alternatively, you can hold them by the legs, lifting them very slightly upwards (this will create a little pressure on the bladder) until their knees are at about the same height as their navel (tummy button).
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5
Sit and wait together. You may have to wait a while (slightly less when they've been given a feed), but it will come. Always make sure you give your child over to someone else to carry out the deed before you go somewhere else.
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When they've finally done what you were after, dispose of the mess. You can simply flush away any business in the toilet if that's the way you did it, or just pour the potty into the bowl and flush. Give the potty a quick wipe-down after every use; the last thing a baby needs is a rash. When out and about, it's surprisingly easy to get rid of liquid waste, as dogs (and other animals, to some extent) go outside in suburbia all the time.
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